• 042-35941921, UAN: 03-111-999-101
  • info@kipscss.net

The Gravest Challenge We Have Ever Faced

  • Khirad Ali
  • Aug, 2018
  • 257
  • National

The per capita availability of water, which was above 5,200 cubic metres in 1947, has now dropped to a mere 1000 cubic metres

Pakistan faces severe water scarcity and is at the verge of running out dry by 2025 owing to a dearth of water reservoirs and decline in the storage capacity of existing dams.

It is clearly visible that the government did not attach significance to any matter pertaining to water, whether it be establishing new dams, providing pure drinking water to the public, stopping India from building dams on Pakistan’s share of water in IOK or making an effort to increase the storage capacity of existing reservoirs.

It is also evident that both the present and previous governments did not have any clear policy despite the warnings given by the Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources (PCRWR), which claimed the country touched the “water stress line” in 1990 before crossing the ‘water scarcity line’ in 2005.

The per capita availability of water, which was above 5,200 cubic meters at the time of independence, has now dropped below the minimum threshold of 1,000 cubic meters per head, officially making us a water-scarce country.

According to experts, the main causes of the water crisis are population growth, climate change and in particular poor management of water. Urbanisation and the absence of a national water policy are also included in this list.

Over drawing of ground water by users because of shortage of surface water has salinised the water. A government report recently revealed that Lahore, Lodhran, Vehari, Khanewal and Multan have lost 90 percent of their underground water. According to the PCRWR, the remaining 10 percent of underground water of these areas has a disproportionately higher amount of arsenic.

It is a grim reality that political parties in Pakistan have been ignoring the grave water conundrum for decades for their own political and regional benefits whereas India swiftly made dams on Pakistan’s share of water in Indian Occupied Kashmir but still, we are in a state of ignorant slumber.

Pakistan faces severe water scarcity and is at the verge of running out dry by 2025 owing to a dearth of water reservoirs and decline in the storage capacity of existing dams.

It is clearly visible that the government did not attach significance to any matter pertaining to water, whether it be establishing new dams, providing pure drinking water to the public, stopping India from building dams on Pakistan’s share of water in IOK or making an effort to increase the storage capacity of existing reservoirs.

It is also evident that both the present and previous governments did not have any clear policy despite the warnings given by the Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources (PCRWR), which claimed the country touched the “water stress line” in 1990 before crossing the ‘water scarcity line’ in 2005.

The per capita availability of water, which was above 5,200 cubic meters at the time of independence, has now dropped below the minimum threshold of 1,000 cubic meters per head, officially making us a water-scarce country.

According to experts, the main causes of the water crisis are population growth, climate change and in particular poor management of water. Urbanisation and the absence of a national water policy are also included in this list.

Over drawing of ground water by users because of shortage of surface water has salinised the water. A government report recently revealed that Lahore, Lodhran, Vehari, Khanewal and Multan have lost 90 percent of their underground water. According to the PCRWR, the remaining 10 percent of underground water of these areas has a disproportionately higher amount of arsenic.

It is a grim reality that political parties in Pakistan have been ignoring the grave water conundrum for decades, for their own political and regional benefits

It is a grim reality that political parties in Pakistan have been ignoring the grave water conundrum for decades for their own political and regional benefits whereas India swiftly made dams on Pakistan’s share of water in Indian Occupied Kashmir but still, we are in a state of ignorant slumber.

With the ongoing hue and cry, the government recently took some measures to counter the ongoing crisis. On April 17th, authorities finally gave a go ahead for the construction of the Diamer-Bhasha dam, as the cost of an estimated Rs. 474 billion.

The move is being hailed given that there are no major water reservoir in Pakistan since Tarbela and Mangla dams were built in the 1960s. Although Pakistan has to strive to accumulate money from i...

Share on facebook or twitter

Email to a friend