• 042-35941921, UAN: 03-111-999-101
  • info@kipscss.net

Eurasian Movement

  • Leonid Savin
  • Jan, 2021
  • 151
  • Geopolitics of South Asia and Interests of Russia

Russia-Heartland is interested in integration processes, while Sea Power, represented by the United States, is interested in controlling the coastal zone

If we are talking about geopolitics, we must apply an integrated and complex approach that combines power (primarily hard power - military strength and economic) and a certain view on the territory issues. The key concepts in geopolitics are Land Power, Sea Power and Manpower. The first two categories relate to geographical determinism and people are more likely to adjust and adapt to environmental conditions, trying to extract from this rational use - mountains, deserts, rivers and seas can serve both as natural boundaries and as a source of well-being. Man Power refers to the field of pure politics - the human will can determine how to develop the territory, whether to use military force, what to do for development and strengthening the national economy, as well as what ideological factors can serve - religions and other forms collective identity, such as nationalism.

In this article, we will look at geopolitical factors, including those numerous drivers that push the centripetal and centrifugal forces of the region. Also we will analyze the perception of South Asia from three positions. To do this, it will be necessary to understand the interests of not only the countries of the region, but also others global players. And Russia's interests cannot be understood without Western opposition, especially in the context of current international relations.

At the same time, we must take into account global geopolitical turbulence and the tectonic shift from a unipolar to a multipolar world order.

Global positioning of the region

There are different definitions of South Asia. Some refer to this region as the territories that were previously controlled British empire. According to the most common version, South Asia includes eight States: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

If we consider the region from a global position, South Asia is the Rimland zone - the coastal zone of Eurasia, characterized by active dynamics, which is confirmed by the historical facts of the presence of the centers of ancient civilizations, trade and migration routes, as well as the banality that more than 70% of the World's population lives off the banks of rivers, seas and oceans.

The history of the last two centuries shows that this Rimland has become a place of intense pressure from Sea Powers -early Britain, then the United States. The logic of Land Power forced the Russian Empire, and then the Soviet Union to respond in a manner based on instruments of deterrence and then ideology.

If the US had once followed the doctrine of Henry Kissinger's rollback and used the myth of the Communist threat, now Washington has a more difficult time justifying its presence in the region. In addition, Russia is separated from these countries by a buffer of the independent states of Central Asia. Although the political reality has changed, the geopolitical logic remains the same.

This is evident from a number of strategic documents. If you have previously under the administration of Barack Obama, the focus was in the South-East Asia and the creation of the Pacific pivot was announced, a new model of the Indo-Pacific region was emerged just now.

Geopolitics of the region

It is obvious that according to its geopolitical characteristics and significance, there are three most important States, which are in the Heartland of South Asia. These are Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. The rest of the countries serve as a kind of buffer and objective reasons can not have a fundamental impact on the geopolitical processes in the region. The role and status of the other five States are limited, they fall into the sphere of influence of other actors, although they can act as significant subjects. So, for example, Sri Lanka has become an important element in China's "Strings of Pearl" strategy.

If we use the terminology of Zbigniew Brzezinski, proposed in his work "The Great Chessboard", on the regional scale Afghanistan, Pakistan and India are active geopolitical actors, while Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Maldives and Sri Lanka as geopolitical centers with varying degrees of importance. Afghanistan we attributed to the actors because of the strategic instability of this state and the influence it has had on the policy of Eurasia for the last 35 years. In some sense, it is negative geo-political actor.

In South Asia context itself, regionalism may be analyzed from different contexts i.e. positive and negative.

It should also be borne in mind that with the exception of Sri Lank...

Share on facebook or twitter

Email to a friend